Heavenly Delicious Indian Dessert Pistachio Saffron Ice Cream Recipe

Kesar Pista Kulfi Recipe

 

Ice Cream which is very well known as Kulfi here in india is one of heavenly soulful dessert having various kinds of flavours according to different different locations & different different ingredients used by peoples { chefs }. Kulfi is usually made from dairy products, such as milk and cream, and often combined with fruits or other ingredients and flavors. It is typically sweetened with sugar or sugar substitutes. Typically, flavourings and colourings are added in addition to stabilizers. The mixture is stirred to incorporate air spaces and cooled below the freezing point of water to prevent detectable ice crystals from forming. The result is a smooth, semi-solid foam that is solid at very low temperatures. It becomes more malleable as its temperature increases. The meaning of the phrase “ice cream” varies from one country to another. Phrases such as “frozen custard”, “frozen yogurt”, “sorbet”, “gelato”, and others are used to distinguish different varieties and styles. In some countries, such as the United States, the phrase “ice cream” applies only to a specific variety, and most governments regulate the commercial use of the various terms according to the relative quantities of the main ingredients, notably the amount of cream. Products that do not meet the criteria to be called ice cream are labelled “frozen dairy dessert” instead. In other countries, such as Italy and Argentina, one word is used for all variants. Analogues made from dairy alternatives, such as goat’s or sheep’s milk, or milk substitutes, are available for those who are lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy protein, or vegan. An early reference to ice cream given by the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1744, reprinted in a magazine in 1877. “1744 in Pennsylvania Mag. Hist. & Biogr . 126 Among the rarities..was some fine ice cream, which, with the strawberries and milk, eat most deliciously.” The 1751 edition of The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse features a recipe for ice cream. OED gives her recipe: “H. GLASSE Art of Cookery. To make Ice Cream set it into the larger Bason. Fill it with Ice, and a Handful of Salt.” The year 1768 saw the publication of L’Art de Bien Faire les Glaces d’Office by M. Emy, a cookbook devoted entirely to recipes for flavoured ices and ice cream. Quaker colonists introduced ice cream to the United States, bringing their ice cream recipes with them. Confectioners sold ice cream at their shops in New York and other cities during the colonial era. Ben Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson were known to have regularly eaten and served ice cream. Records, kept by a merchant from Catham street, New York, show George Washington spending approximately $200 on ice cream in the summer of 1790. The same records show president Thomas Jefferson having an 18 step recipe for ice cream. First Lady Dolley Madison, wife of U.S. President James Madison, served ice cream at her husband’s Inaugural Ball in 1813. Small-scale hand-cranked ice cream freezers were invented in England by Agnes Marshall and in America by Nancy Johnson in the 1840s. The most popular flavours of ice cream in North America are vanilla and chocolate. In the Mediterranean, ice cream appears to have been accessible to ordinary people by the mid-eighteenth century. Ice cream became popular and inexpensive in England in the mid-nineteenth century, when Swiss émigré Carlo Gatti set up the first stand outside Charing Cross station in 1851. He sold scoops in shells for one penny. Prior to this, ice cream was an expensive treat confined to those with access to an ice house. Gatti built an ‘ice well’ to store ice that he cut from Regent’s Canal under a contract with the Regent’s Canal Company. By 1860, he expanded the business and began importing ice on a large scale from Norway. Ice cream soda was invented in the 1870s, adding to ice cream’s popularity. The invention of this cold treat is attributed to American Robert Green in 1874, although there is no conclusive evidence to prove his claim. The ice cream sundae originated in the late 19th century. Several men claimed to have created the first sundae, but there is no conclusive evidence to support any of their stories. Some sources say that the sundae was invented to circumvent blue laws, which forbade serving sodas on Sunday. Towns claiming to be the birthplace of the sundae include Buffalo, Two Rivers, Ithaca, and Evanston. Both the ice cream cone and banana split became popular in the early 20th century. The first mention of the cone being used as an edible receptacle for the ice cream is in Mrs. A.B. Marshall’s Book of Cookery of 1888. Her recipe for “Cornet with Cream” said that “the cornets were made with almonds and baked in the oven, not pressed between irons”.The ice cream cone was popularized in the USA at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, MO.

 

 

Kulfi
Indian Dessert

 

 

Ingredients:

 

2 Kg Full Cream Milk

4-6 Saffron Strands

1/8 Cup Sugar

4 Tbsp Cornflour

150 Gm Fresh Khoya grated & mashed khoya slightly { 3/8 Cup Grated }

2 Tbsp Pistachio very finely cut

2 Tbsp Almonds very finely cut

8 Crushed Green Cardamoms

 

Preparations:

 

First we dissolve Cornflour in 2 Cup Fresh Milk. Keep aside. Boil the remaining milk on medium flame with Saffron in a pan till it reduced to half. Add Sugar. Add cornflour paste. Boil & cook till the sugar is very well dissolved. Remove from heat & wait till cool slightly. Add Khoya, Almonds, Pistachio & Crushed Green Cardamom. Fill the mixture in the Ice Cream Moulds then freeze overnight or 5-10 hours.

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