Gujarati Vegetarian Healthy Food Tameta Ni Katri Recipe

Healthy Vegan Katri

 

Gujarati peoples mostly love to eat Vegetarian & Vegan Foods those are yummy & awesome in taste. Tameta Ni Katri is one of famous Vegan Food of Gujarat. The word “tomato” comes from the Spanish tomate, which in turn comes from the Nahuatl word tomatl, meaning “the swelling fruit”. Tomato plants are vines, initially decumbent, typically growing 180 cmor more above the ground if supported, although erect bush varieties have been bred, generally 100 cm tall or shorter. Indeterminate types are “tender” perennials, dying annually in temperate climates, although they can live up to three years in a greenhouse in some cases. Determinate types are annual in all climates. Tomato plants are dicots, and grow as a series of branching stems, with a terminal bud at the tip that does the actual growing. When that tip eventually stops growing, whether because of pruning or flowering, lateral buds take over and grow into other, fully functional, vines. 

 

Ingredients:

 

8 Big Tomatoes

2 Tsp Mustard Oil

2 Tsp Flour { Besan }

 

Paste:

 

16 Flakes Garlic

1/4 Tsp Sugar

2 Tsp Salt

5 Tsp Cumin Seeds

1/4 Tsp Chilli Powder

1/8 Tsp Turmeric Powder

4 Green Chillies

2-3 Pinches of Asafoetida

4 Tbsp Chopped Coriander Leaves

4 Tbsp Coriander Powder

 

Preparations:

 

First we wash then cut the vegetable horizontally into 2 halves then we grind all paste ingredients. Make a fine paste. Add flour & oil to the paste then make 16 equal portions of this masala. Now apply this masala about 2 Tsp full on the cut surface of all Tomato halves. Spread 2 Tsp Oil in a nonstick frying pan. Keep on heat. Put Tomatoes with cut side smeared with masala in the Oil. Cook uncovered for 6-8 minutes on low heat. Now turn tomato slices very very carefully. Cover & Cook for 10 minutes on low heat. When they well cooked remove from heat then garnish with chopped Coriander Leaves. Eat or serve with any indian bread.

 

 

Vegan Recipe
Gujarati Food

 

 

 

Tomato vines are typically pubescent, meaning covered with fine short hairs. These hairs facilitate the vining process, turning into roots wherever the plant is in contact with the ground and moisture, especially if the vine’s connection to its original root has been damaged or severed. Most tomato plants have compound leaves, and are called regular leaf plants, but some cultivars have simple leaves known as potato leaf style because of their resemblance to that particular relative. Of RL plants, there are variations, such as rugose leaves, which are deeply grooved, and variegated, angora leaves, which have additional colors where a genetic mutation causes chlorophyll to be excluded from some portions of the leaves. The leaves are 10–25 cm long, odd pinnate, with five to 9 leaflets on petioles, each leaflet up to 8 cm long, with a serrated margin; both the stem and leaves are densely glandular-hairy. Their flowers, appearing on the apical meristem, have the anthers fused along the edges, forming a column surrounding the pistil’s style. Flowers in domestic cultivars can be self-fertilizing. The flowers are 1–2 cm across, yellow, with five pointed lobes on the corolla; they are borne in a cyme of three to 12 together. Tomato fruit is classified as a berry. As a true fruit, it develops from the ovary of the plant after fertilization, its flesh comprising the pericarp walls. The fruit contains hollow spaces full of seeds and moisture, called locular cavities. These vary, among cultivated species, according to type. Some smaller varieties have two cavities, globe-shaped varieties typically have three to five, beefsteak tomatoes have a great number of smaller cavities, while paste tomatoes have very few, very small cavities. For propagation, the seeds need to come from a mature fruit, and be dried or fermented before germination. Tomatoes that have been modified using genetic engineering have been developed, and although none are commercially available now, they have been in the past. The first commercially available genetically modified food was a variety of tomato named the Flavr Savr, which was engineered to have a longer shelf life. Scientists are continuing to develop tomatoes with new traits not found in natural crops, such as increased resistance to pests or environmental stresses. Other projects aim to enrich tomatoes with substances that may offer health benefits or provide better nutrition. An international consortium of researchers from 10 countries, among them researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, began sequencing the tomato genome in 2004, and is creating a database of genomic sequences and information on the tomato and related plants. A prerelease version of the genome was made available in December 2009.The genomes of its mitochondria and chloroplasts are also being sequenced as part of the project. The complete genome for the cultivar Heinz 1706 was published on 31 May 2012 in Nature. Since many other fruits, like strawberries, apples, melons, and bananas share the same characteristics and genes, researchers stated the published genome could help to improve food quality, food security and reduce costs of all of these fruits. The tomato is native to western South America. Wild versions were small, like cherry tomatoes, and most likely yellow rather than red. The Spanish first introduced tomatoes to Europe, where they became used in Spanish and Italian food. The French and northern Europeans erroneously thought them to be poisonous because they are a member of the deadly nightshade family. This was exacerbated by the interaction of the tomato’s acidic juice with pewter plates. The leaves and immature fruit contains tomatine, which in large quantities would be toxic. However, the ripe fruit contains no tomatine. The recorded history of tomatoes in Italy dates back to at least 31 October 1548, when the house steward of Cosimo de’ Medici, the grand duke of Tuscany, wrote to the Medici private secretary informing him that the basket of tomatoes sent from the grand duke’s Florentine estate at Torre del Gallo “had arrived safely”. Tomatoes were grown mainly as ornamentals early on after their arrival in Italy. For example, the Florentine aristocrat Giovanvettorio Soderini wrote how they “were to be sought only for their beauty”, and were grown only in gardens or flower beds. The tomato’s ability to mutate and create new and different varieties helped contribute to its success and spread throughout Italy. However, even in areas where the climate supported growing tomatoes, their habit of growing to the ground suggested low status. They were not adopted as a staple of the peasant population because they were not as filling as other fruits already available. Additionally, both toxic and inedible varieties discouraged many people from attempting to consume or prepare any other varieties. In certain areas of Italy, such as Florence, the fruit was used solely as a tabletop decoration, until it was incorporated into the local cuisine in the late 17th or early 18th century. The earliest discovered cookbook with tomato recipes was published in Naples in 1692, though the author had apparently obtained these recipes from Spanish sources. Unique varieties were developed over the next several hundred years for uses such as dried tomatoes, sauce tomatoes, pizza tomatoes, and tomatoes for long-term storage. These varieties are usually known for their place of origin as much as by a variety name. For example, Pomodorino del Piennolo del Vesuvio is the “hanging tomato of Vesuvius” or the Pomodoro di Pachino and Pomodorino di Manduria. Five different varieties have traditionally been used to make these “hanging” tomatoes. They are Fiaschella, Lampadina, Patanara, Principe Borghese, and Re Umberto. Other tomatoes that originated in Italy include San Marzano, Borgo Cellano, Christopher Columbus, Costoluto Genovese, and Italian Pear. These tomatoes are characterized by a relatively intense flavor compared to varieties typically grown elsewhere.

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